Gallery of Carbon's Travels

Gallery of Carbon's Travels

  • see caption Riding a bike adds no greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.
  • see caption The Los Angeles Metro helps people travel without cars, cutting back on harmful greenhouse gas emissions. Photo credit: Metro Transportation Library and Archive.
  • see caption This electric “Smart Car” runs without releasing heat-trapping greenhouse gases. Photo credit: mariodo59.
  • see caption Commuters ride to work on a city bike path, adding no greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Photograph by Greg Stephens.
  • see caption Pollution from cars and factories can create dense smog in cities. Photo credit: Metro Transportation Library and Archive
  • see caption A car’s emissions are checked at a station in California. Photograph by R. Couse-Baker
  • see caption Burning 110 gallons of gasoline will produce one metric ton of carbon dioxide, enough to fill this green balloon in front of the United Nations building.
  • see caption A smokestack releases greenhouse gases and other pollutants into the atmosphere.
  • see caption Gardens help reduce global warming because plants remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Photograph by Bet Taylor.
  • see caption Planting vegetables not only produces tasty food, but it also helps to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
  • see caption Planting a garden is a great way to remove carbon from the atmosphere.
  • see caption These baby pine trees will help regrow areas where forests have been cut down and help to remove carbon from the atmosphere.
  • see caption This field in Brazil used to be a thick rainforest. Rainforests are important because they help remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Photo credit: UN Photo/P Sudhakaran
  • see captionThis old-growth Douglas Fir tree keeps a lot of carbon out of the atmosphere. Photo credit: US Fish and Wildlife Service
  • see caption A thick forest on the Oregon coast. Forests help cool the planet by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Photo credit: US Fish and Wildlife Service.
  • see caption This heavily deforested area no longer helps keep carbon out of the atmosphere.
  • see caption A section of Brazilian rainforest from 1975 (left) and 2009 (right). The white portions have been stripped of trees. Photo credit: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). From Latin America and the Caribbean Atlas of our Changing Environment (2010).
  • see caption A bird sits in a nest surrounded by trash that could have been recycled.
  • see captionVolunteers remove trash that has washed up on a beach.
  • see caption Recycling these stacks of aluminum cans will save a lot of energy. Photograph by Laura Gilmore.
  • see caption Trash litters a beach in Haiti. Photo credit: UN Photo/Sophia Paris.
  • see caption Recycling paper, plastic, and aluminum helps reduce energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions.
  • see caption Birds scavenge for food above a landfill. Photo credit: UN Photo/Evan Schneider
  • see caption Recycling these plastic bottles will save a lot of energy.
  • see caption A massive dump in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Much of the large amount of waste humans produce ends up in dumps. Photo credit: UN Photo/Kibae Park
  • see caption Humans produce a huge amount of waste – much of it ends up in dumps or as litter. Here, trash litters a beach in Timor-Leste. Photo credit: UN Photo/Martine Perret.
  • see caption Thrift stores provide a good way to recycle and reuse. Photograph by Albert Ray Mock.
  • see caption Plastic and aluminum cans are sorted for recycling. Recycling saves energy and reduces carbon emissions.